Jordan Braz | October 27th, 2015

Godsend, or weapon of mass destruction? Over at Quartz, Monday Note editor Frederic Filloux has sounded the alarm (again) about ad blocking, which is spreading like wildfire, getting more sophisticated and making a bunch of media and marketing types very, very nervous: http://bit.ly/1LFjHmG.

We're of two minds about this. When it comes to seizure-inducing banners, invasive pop-ups or videos that start playing without being asked, it's hard to see ad blocking as anything other than a Very Good Thing. However the news that ad blockers are starting to target native advertising and branded content -- for example, articles or microsites that are 'sponsored by' a company or organisation -- is a bit troubling. Okay, so we have a vested interest. And yes, there is no shortage of sponsored content that probably deserves to be zapped. But that applies to all media output -- and what about the quality stuff?

Savvy companies use or sponsor content not to hammer home a blunt marketing message, but to engage people and position themselves as authorities in their fields, which requires the content to be convincing, and to contain real information or insights. Who would deny Alibaba might have some useful things to say about e-commerce, or HSBC about the opening of China's capital markets? Ad blocking certainly has its place, but targeting all sponsored content is a bit like using a flamethrower to take on a mosquito. We'd argue for a more nuanced approach -- which is where some good, old-fashioned human editorial judgement may need to come in.

(As an aside, for an example of good, informative sponsored content, check out this Economist collaboration with Asia-focused Australian bank ANZ, which looks at the various ways integration is progressing in Asia-Pacific: integrasian.economist.com. Full disclosure: n/n was involved in this project, but it shows how a company can contribute to the dialogue around a remarkable process in which it's also playing a role.)

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